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Orange-fleshed Honey Dew

Scientific name for honey dew: Cucumis melo - Honeydew fruit is known for having superior food safety, food quality, and fruit marketability attributes compared to orange-fleshed netted muskmelon (cantaloupe). One serving of honeydew melon provides an excellent source of Vitamin C and Vitamin A

How Do Melons Grow?

Melons are a warm-weather annual plant sensitive to cold temperatures at any stage of growth. In fact, seeded melons germinate best under hotter temperatures, up to 95 F, and can tolerate temperatures in excess of 100 F. In California, melons go to market beginning in May with a continuous supply through October, peaking in July and August

Recipe for Rainbow Melons

A serving of melons is one-half cup cubed melon. This is about the size of one cupped handful. Eat a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables throughout the day to reach your total daily needs.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup watermelon balls
  • 1 cup cantaloupe balls
  • 1 cup honeydew melon balls
  • Serving Size: 6 - 1/2 cup each
  • Use a melon baller to scoop melons to make a nice presentation for serving.


Enjoy a Slice of Melon History

Cantaloupes were named after the Roman town of Cantalupo in Italy where they were grown in abundance. Melons were first cultivated in Persia and northern Africa nearly 4,000 years ago, and later by ancient Greeks and Romans.

Introduced to western and northern Europe during the Middle Ages, melons were harvested by the Spaniards and later the French and British.

Christopher Columbus brought over the first melon seeds to North America on his second expedition, while watermelons arrived with African slaves.

In 1683, the melon was introduced to California by Spanish missionaries.

Melons and watermelons were grown almost exclusively in home gardens until the first half of the 20th century, when more disease and wilt-resistant cultivars were developed by the USDA

Melons are members of the gourd family.

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